javanejoon:

Sometimes I am reminded of previous posts and today I’ve been thinking about gol ab and rose petals.

Originally posted on Persian Cuisine from Javane's Kitchen:

The process of extracting oil from Damask rose petals was first practiced in Iran mainly for its perfume and then from rose petal oil came rose-water or golab. Both rose petal oil and rose-water  are now used the world over for cooking, beauty preparations and for the relief of medical conditions .

Rose water or golab has a very distinctive smell and flavour is used extensively in Persian deserts, such as ‘shir berenge’  or rice pudding,   in jams and ice creams such as bastani ba faloodeh ( my personal favourite) , pastries  such as ‘ baamiah’  and ‘halva’ and in cookies such as ‘naan berenji ‘ the list is endless.

Rose water also has symbolic meanings within Iranian traditions and culture. It represents cleansing and as such is often placed on the ‘haft sein’  table at new year or Naw rooz ( a table containing 7 traditional items…

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javanejoon:

I made a new batch of advieh today. Should be enough to keep me going until autumn :) Keep it in a dark, cool space in an air tight container to help keep it fresh.

Originally posted on Persian Cuisine from Javane's Kitchen:

If you ask anyone who has never eaten Persian food before they always imagine  that it’s  heavily spiced, a lot like Indian food! And then they’re always surprised to learn it isn’t!

Persian cooking  is made with a delicate balance of sweet and sour, hot and cold and the flavours are subtle and memorable. Quite unlike most other middle eastern food, Persian cuisine has a flavour all of its own. Often we take a recipe and ‘Persianise’ it, like Spaghetti ! We add what we think it lacks to create a better balance, or a taste that we prefer.

The ingredients of Persian food are largely the same ingredients that food all over the world is made from  and yet when we  add spice to a recipe,  it literally transforms it.  In Persian cooking we use fruits, herbs, flowers and ground roots to create a delicate aroma and a rich…

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javanejoon:

Been thinking about Kookoo all day!!! Now I just have to make this tomorrow and take it cold for my lunch at work on Friday :)

Originally posted on Persian Cuisine from Javane's Kitchen:

Protein packed and full of healthy fresh green herbs and nothing could be easier than making kookoo. Kookoo  makes a great lunch or light supper or even something to take out with you on a picnic as it  can be eaten hot or cold and both are equally delicious. Kookoo can be made in less than 30 mins and cooked either in the oven or in a pan on the cooker, which ever you prefer.

KOOKOO SABZI

~~INGREDIENTS ~~

  • 6 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon of advieh
  • 1 teaspoon of salt
  • pepper to taste
  • 1 teaspoon of baking powder
  • 1 cup  of coriander ( if you prefer you can use dried herbs, simply use 1/2 the  amount and soak in water first. Remember to squeeze the water from the herbs before you use them)
  • 1 cup of parsley
  • 1 cup of dill
  • a tablespoon of fenugrek
  • 1 onion thinly sliced or grated

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How to make liquid saffron ✾

~HOW TO MAKE LIQUID SAFFRON~

liquified  saffron is essential to Persian cooking. You will use it in rice dishes,  Khoresht and for deserts and even in your chai. It gives Persian food its unique and subtle flavour and sets it apart.  I always keep my saffron in an airtight container in a dark cupboard to ensure its rich yellow colour and to avoid it loosing any of its strength of flavour. saffron is very expensive to buy so you want to take care of it. I personally only buy Persian saffron because I know its good quality and I’ll get the results and taste I want. Spanish saffron is widely available in the UK and I buy this only if I run out ( which almost never happens ).

  1. Take a really good pinch or of saffron and place it in a pestle and mortar, add a tiny pinch of sugar or salt ( use which ever will suit your recipe) and grind. I use a pestle and mortar but many people use small food processor and powder up bulk batches of saffron strands at a time .
  2. Place the ground or powdery saffron in cup and add a little boiling water and stir and then cover and allow to infuse for at least 30 minutes. The longer you leave it, the richer the color.

Once you’ve made liquid saffron you can keep it in the fridge for about 2-3 days, but remember to cover it with cling film or keep in an air tight container!

Fact: Saffron is said to help ward off mild depressive thinking. I dont know how true this is but just the colour alone makes you think of sunshine and that makes me smile :)

javanejoon:

This is a wonderful dish that everyone loves and so versatile. I love to take it for lunch when Im working.

Originally posted on Persian Cuisine from Javane's Kitchen:

This recipe is very simple and easy to make. It’s really a meal in itself,  delicious for lunch or dinner and ideal for a buffet at a party. I have made it for picnics with kotlets and stuffed it into pitta bread for a working lunch. Its versatility is vast. It’s very similar to Russian Salad but personally I have never felt the need to try that. I am always being asked to make Salad Olivieh for parties and gatherings.  Everyone loves it. It’s completely gluten-free which is always a bonus for me.

SALAD OLIVIEH

This recipe will serve up to 4 people. Most of the work is in the preparation of the ingredients.

Ingredients:

  • 400 gr’s Cooked chicken pieces shredded into small pieces no larger than the size of you nail. I usually use breasts but you can use the equivalent of any chicken meat.
  • 4 large potatoes…

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Faloodeh. Love at first bite

~~FALOODEH ~~

Faloodeh is an experience you will never regret. It has its roots back  in ancient Persia and is particularly associated with Shiraz.  With  a consistency of something between a slush puppy and sorbet, it’s memorable because of the rice noodles and refreshingly delicious due to  the sweetness of the rose-water and sourness of the limes . The combination of these three ingredients makes it distinctive and fairly unique to Iran. I’ve never come across any one who doesn’t love it at first bite. …..

This is my recipe for Faloodeh, you will no doubt find other versions but this is easy.  Add lime or lemon juice, it works well with the sweetness of the rose-water and add sour cherry syrup, pistachios and mint to garnish. Perfect desert for any time of the year and delightfully refreshing in the summer months!

Faloodeh – Rice Noodle Sorbet

~Recipe for use with an ice cream maker or by hand ~

Ingredients ~

  • 2  cups of caster  sugar
  • 1 cup of water
  • 1/2 cup of rose-water
  • 1 Vietnamese rice noodles (vermicelli) broken into 2 inch pieces.

garnish: pistachios, sour cherry syrup, any berries, fresh lime juice and lime wedges.

Method:

  1. Boil the rice noodles in boiling water for 20 seconds (or according to instructions) and no more or they will be too mushy.
  2. Remove the noodles from the pan, rinse  under cold water and put to one side.
  3. Place the sugar and water into a pan and bring to the point just before it boils.
  4. Remove the pan from the heat and add the rose-water and set aside.
  5. Allow it to cool off completely.
  6. Pour this mixture into an ice cream maker and turn it on.  Allow it begin to set then add half of the noodles and then follow the same process again.
  7. Set the Ice cream maker to ‘sorbet’ setting, turn on  and relax !
  8. OR combine the mix as above, place in a bowl and allow to begun to set in the freezer. After about an hour, remove from the freezer and gently using a fork, disturb the setting process and then place back in the freezer and repeat a few times until you’re happy with the consistency.

For garnish: Traditional:  Lime juice , mint, and pistachios. As an alternative  try sour cherry syrup juice, Mango syrup or any seasonal berries  raspberries are delicious or mango and strawberries, blueberries or any fruit you fancy.

Nooshi joonet ~ you’re going to enjoy this !

Pumpkin and Sweet Potatoe Soup

PUMPKIN AND SWEET POTATOE SOUP

There’s nothing more satisfying than a bowl of soup on these cold wintery days. Pumpkins are seasonal so we have to make good use of them while we can!! Today I wanted to experiment a little and thought I spice up my usual pumpkin soup recipe and persianise it! So here it is. It’s very easy to make. There are no hard and fast rules about ingredients or measurements of, it’s very relaxed and delicious. Hope you enjoy.

~ INGREDIENTS ~

  • 1/2  pumpkin seeded and cubed.
  • 1  Large onion diced
  • 2 Sweet potatoes peeled and chopped.
  • 3-4  Garlic cloves diced.
  • 1 Red pepper seeded.
  • 1/2 cup of liquid saffron.
  • 1/2 stock ( I used chicken stock but what ever you have is good)
  • salt and pepper to taste.
  • 1/2 teaspoon of turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon of advieh
  • 1 dried lime.

~METHOD~

  1.  Place the oven on about 200 degrees. Brush the peppers with a little olive oil and bake until the skin begins to blacken. Remove from the oven and place the peppers in a plastic bag. Put aside to cool.
  2. Using a little oil, fry the onions and garlic until it begins to turn golden.
  3.  Add the cubed pumpkin and sweet potatoe, salt, pepper, turmeric, the saffron, chicken stock and the dried lime. If you haven’t got dried limes, use lime juice or powdered lime.
  4.  Pour enough hot water on to cover the vegetables and leave to simmer until the veg is soft, usually around 20 mins.
  5.  Go back to your peppers and peel the skin off.
  6.  If you want smooth soup, blend everything together. If you like your soup lumpy just chop the red pepper flesh as small as possible and add.

Hey presto ….. a delicious sweet and sour soup, warming and thoroughly nutritious. Garnish with chopped corriander. Just what you need on a damp winters day. Eat now, serve for supper or take it for lunch the next day. BTW it freezes well too.

~Nooshi joonet ~